Tried and Tested: Clippings quilt pattern

I am currently working on this lovely pattern called Clippings which was published in Issue 28 of Love Patchwork and Quilting magazine. The pattern is for a giant block which finishes at 24 inches square. I wanted to turn my block in to a baby blanket so I added a 3 inch border.

Clippings WIP front

I didn’t use any wadding in this blanket and instead chose to back it in a cosy flannel fabric for a bit of extra warmth.

Clippings WIP back

You can see some of the sewing lines. In the centre where I did a bit of hand sewing with embroidery thread, just to anchor the centre piece. For the rest I decided to ‘stitch in the ditch’ using a red thread, around the dark fabric. Stitching in the ditch is usually done with a matching thread that will not show, but I wanted the thread to show, the red gives a subtle outline to the pieced design.  I love how it turned out, but it does require very careful stitching and concentration as any wobbling off will be very visible against the white background.

I just need to decide what I am going to do for the binding.

Fabrics used:
Top: Flappy Owl by Copenhagen Print Factory, Owls by Copenhagen Print Factory, Dot in Dots by Copenhagen Print Factory, White Every Day Organic Solids by Clothworks. Back: Twig Fall Tomato by Birch Fabrics.

Happy sewing,

Lisa at The Quilting Bird

Linking up with Bee Social and Sew Cute Tuesday and Freemotion By The River and Fabric Tuesday

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How to make a very easy flannel baby blanket.

organic flannels blankets

Flannel fabrics are just made for the winter months. Their soft cosiness is just perfect for snuggling up in. It’s lovely to sew with too (if you can stop stroking it for long enough), and perfect for whipping up a simple and quick baby blanket.

Organic Flannel Baby Blanket

This is so easy to make I hesitate to call this a tutorial.

Flannel Blanket Sewing SuppliesGather together your sewing supplies:

Fabric, I am using 2 pieces 75cm x 95cm to make a crib size, but you can cut the fabric to whatever size you choose. Just remember to cut 2 pieces.

You will also need pins, scissors, rotary cutter and mat, ruler, fabric marking pen, hand sewing needle and embroidery floss. Oh, and a sewing machine of course.  Continue reading

New Year Resolutions

making organic flannel baby blanket

Well it’s not really a resolution…I don’t make resolutions, why set yourself up for stress and recriminations! No not a resolution but a decision. I decided to start blogging again. After a break of just over a year it really is time, to make time for the poor neglected blog!

I had a very busy 2015. I am travelling the road of becoming more ‘planet concious’ and wanted to reflect that in my business as well as personal life. In September I launched my own website The Quilting Bird, which you can find on the Shop tab. Currently I am selling organic cotton fabrics, some gorgeous prints for clothing and craft projects. I will shortly be adding organic flannel baby blankets to the shop, you can see me hand finishing them in the picture above.

The feel of the blog may change, I have no plans about how it will go, just gonna let it flow and see where it takes me.

Looking forward to all that 2016 has got for me, and I hope you are too.

Lisa at The Quilting Bird

 

Hand dyed fabric exploits

About 2 years ago I purchased a class form Craftsy called ‘The Art of Cloth Dyeing’ by Jane Dunnwold, and I have been totally hooked on dyeing fabric ever since.

This weekend I turned my bathroom in to my chemistry lab and began to play.

yellow hand dyed fabric

The top yellow pattern was made by continually folding the fabric in half until it could not be folded any more. The bottom yellow fabric was scrunched up in to a tight ball.

red hand dyed fabric

The top red fabric was pleated. The bottom red fabric was folded in the same way as the yellow above but the pattern here is much more pronounced.

blue hand dyed fabirc

The top blue fabric was made with a flag fold. The bottom blue is a pleat fold the same as the red pleated above.

I wanted to show you the different outcomes you can get with hand dyeing even when using the same techniques. For some people this would be off putting, but it is this lack of uniformity and the organic nature of the designs on the fabric that I adore. Manipulating the fabric by folding creates a resist to the dye and can produce some stunning patterns.

It is this unknown quality that separates hand dyed fabrics from printed fabrics. A print will be repeated across a width of fabric and each print will be exactly the same. You can see from the photographs that hand dyeing produces a unique pattern across the entirety of the fabric. Whilst it is possible to control the variables in hand dyeing to achieve a similar result, each batch of fabric dyed will be inherently unique.

The fabric squares in the photo’s are 10 inch cotton poplin and I used procion mx dye, which is a fibre reactive dye for cotton, linen and silk. The dye will react differently to different types and weights of fabric.

All of the fabrics here were dyed with 1 pure colour, that is a colour that does not have any other colours mixed in to it. I will do another post showing some mixed dyes and adding colour using a technique called overdyeing (basically dyeing the fabric again in another colour).

If you fancy giving hand dyeing a try Colourcraft (UK) do a starter kit, which comes with 6 dyes and the auxiliary chemicals needed for dyeing, however you will need to buy a wash product such as synthrapol.

My favourite of the dyed fabrics is the blue pleat fold, which is your favourite?

Lisa at The Quilting Bird.

Free Dashwood Studio fabrics

I was able to attend The Festival of Quilts 2014 in Birmingham, which I was very excited about. Unfortunately I do not have any photo’s due to technical difficulties (I forgot my camera…what can I say). Anyway, I arrived home to find this waiting for me.

Dashwood Studio Fabric

This lovely fat quarter bundle is a fabric collection from UK based textile design company Dashwood Studio, click here to read about how much I love them. This particular fat quarter set called Retro Orchard by designer Wendy Kendall.

The fabrics are really fun and lively so I have designed a simple quilt pattern to really show off the fabrics.

But the best thing about getting this fat quarter set, is that it was completely FREE. Yes that’s right, I didn’t have to pay for it. I took out a subscription for Love Patchwork and Quilting magazine and got this lovely bundle of fabric worth £25 FREE. You can get your free fabric bundle too, the offer is running until the end of October for UK subscribers.

Support British talent.

Lisa at The Quilting Bird