How to make a very easy flannel baby blanket.

organic flannels blankets

Flannel fabrics are just made for the winter months. Their soft cosiness is just perfect for snuggling up in. It’s lovely to sew with too (if you can stop stroking it for long enough), and perfect for whipping up a simple and quick baby blanket.

Organic Flannel Baby Blanket

This is so easy to make I hesitate to call this a tutorial.

Flannel Blanket Sewing SuppliesGather together your sewing supplies:

Fabric, I am using 2 pieces 75cm x 95cm to make a crib size, but you can cut the fabric to whatever size you choose. Just remember to cut 2 pieces.

You will also need pins, scissors, rotary cutter and mat, ruler, fabric marking pen, hand sewing needle and embroidery floss. Oh, and a sewing machine of course.  Continue reading

How to set pigment printer ink on fabric & Thank Friday It’s Finished!

Some weeks ago I shared with you a wedding anniversary photo quilt   I was making, and I mentioned that I had experienced some difficulty getting the printer ink to set on the fabric. I have now managed to resolve that problem and I wanted to share what I learned. But first it has been rather remiss of me not to show the finished photo quilt so here it is.

Wedding photo quilt wall hanging

Showing the close up first. You might have been thinking that photographs on fabric will be grainy and ill-defined, but actually you can get some very clear pictures by choosing a tightly woven fabric and making some adjustments to the photograph in a photo editor.

The background fabric is a white on white, you can just about make out the pattern if you squint. I chose the colour to tie in with the wedding theme. Similarly the red thread used to define and ‘frame’ the photographs, is a similar shade to the red in the bridal bouquet and bridesmaids dresses. I used a polyester wadding, so it can be washed without fear of shrinking. The backing is just a plain calico (muslin) fabric. For the quilting I obviously was not going to stitch through the photo’s themselves, instead I have stitched in the ditch around each photo.

This is a wall hanging. It’s finished size is 84cm X 71cm (33 X 28 inches). Here is the full view.

Wedding photo quiltSo back to the issue of getting pigment ink to set on fabric. When I began printing photographs on to fabric a few years ago I followed one of the many tutorials out there, which directed me to use a product called ‘Bubble Je Sett’. Bubble Jet Set is a liquid that the fabric is soaked in prior to printing, it then enables dye based ink jet printer ink to ‘bond’ with the fabric. This process also produces a fabric that can safely be machine washed without the photo fading away. This was the method I had used very successfully for years. Continue reading

TUTORIAL: Personalised Drawstring Santa Sack or Toy Bag

This week I have been working on writing a tutorial for how to make a santa sack. I have had so many lovely messages about the santa sack I finished last week (view that post here), from people who are new to sewing, I decided to share how I made mine. santa sack tutorialThe santa sack for this tutorial has a simplified version of the patchwork, I did on the other sack. There are no seams to match up, so it is not too scary for anyone new to patchwork. The construction on a drawstring bag is also pretty straightforward for beginner sewers. Of course if you choose different fabrics for this tutorial you can make a large toy bag instead.

drawstring toy bag

This toy bag was made with an old sheet and fabric scraps.

Drawstring Toy Bag

Back of toy bag showing patchwork.

I would really love to see your finished santa sacks, you can email them to me at the address on my about page and I will feature my favourites. If you are a beginner (or like me you find patterns seem to be written in a foreign language) and you get a bit stuck, please drop me a line and I will do my best to help you out. Continue reading

How to add a binding to your quilt.

Quilt Binding Tute

 

(The link to the binding tutorial is at the bottom of the post *Edited – The quilt in the photo is made by Marzi from Made by Marzipan, it is the quilt she uses to demonstrate how to attach a quilt binding)

Adding a binding to the quilt is generally the last step in making a quilt, although I will sometimes go back in and add more quilting after the binding has been added.

When I started quilting I really struggled to understand how to get those beautiful mitred corners. Even after I mastered that I still could not get to grips with the invisible join. The join isn’t actually ‘invisible’, it just looks the same as all the other joins so you can’t tell where the start and finish points are. I tried many different methods and gave up on achieving an invisible join for a long time.

I then came across a great tutorial on youtube, (gotta love youtube) and I am going to share it with you. It’s not too lengthy, under 8 minutes and has really simple, clear, step by step instructions. I love this video, I go back to it all the time to keep me in check. The video tutorial is by  Marzi (aka Maureen) at Made By Marzipan. If you love crafting click here to have a look at her cute blog packed full of lovely crafty ideas.

Heres what Marzi says about her quilt binding video:

“This tutorial includes everything you need to know to add a beautiful binding to your quilt! Learn how to sew a binding strip, how to create crisp mitered corners, and how to attach the binding together with a professional “invisible join.” See three different techniques for stitching the binding to the back side of your quilt. These instructions make it easy to bind a blanket.”

And after that long intro here is the link to the video click here and you can see the easy method Marzi uses to attach a binding to that gorgeous quilt in the picture.

Lisa at The Quilting Bird

You might also like to take a look at my Etsy shop TheQuiltingBird