How to set pigment printer ink on fabric & Thank Friday It’s Finished!

Some weeks ago I shared with you a wedding anniversary photo quilt   I was making, and I mentioned that I had experienced some difficulty getting the printer ink to set on the fabric. I have now managed to resolve that problem and I wanted to share what I learned. But first it has been rather remiss of me not to show the finished photo quilt so here it is.

Wedding photo quilt wall hanging

Showing the close up first. You might have been thinking that photographs on fabric will be grainy and ill-defined, but actually you can get some very clear pictures by choosing a tightly woven fabric and making some adjustments to the photograph in a photo editor.

The background fabric is a white on white, you can just about make out the pattern if you squint. I chose the colour to tie in with the wedding theme. Similarly the red thread used to define and ‘frame’ the photographs, is a similar shade to the red in the bridal bouquet and bridesmaids dresses. I used a polyester wadding, so it can be washed without fear of shrinking. The backing is just a plain calico (muslin) fabric. For the quilting I obviously was not going to stitch through the photo’s themselves, instead I have stitched in the ditch around each photo.

This is a wall hanging. It’s finished size is 84cm X 71cm (33 X 28 inches). Here is the full view.

Wedding photo quiltSo back to the issue of getting pigment ink to set on fabric. When I began printing photographs on to fabric a few years ago I followed one of the many tutorials out there, which directed me to use a product called ‘Bubble Je Sett’. Bubble Jet Set is a liquid that the fabric is soaked in prior to printing, it then enables dye based ink jet printer ink to ‘bond’ with the fabric. This process also produces a fabric that can safely be machine washed without the photo fading away. This was the method I had used very successfully for years. Continue reading

Thank Friday It’s Finished! Papillion Baby Quilt

Papillion Baby Quilt

I have finally finished this very pretty baby quilt. I showed you this a few weeks ago when it was just a quilt top, click here to see that post and find out how I used the disappearing nine patch block technique to create the Papillion Baby quilt.

Papillion Baby QuiltI decided to quilt this in a spiral. I do love spirals, they bring a lovely softness to the hard edges of square blocks. The quilting lines are about half an inch apart, which gives a really lovely crinkle to the fabric. (Yes, everything is lovely today!) The thread I used for the quilting is Mettler silk-finish 100% cotton mercerised, this is a 50 weight thread. I used a lilac and light purple colour that coordinated with the colours in the quilt, the silk finish has a pretty sheen to it which fit well with feel of the quilt.

This is the first time I have used a 50 weight cotton to quilt with and I admit I embarked on this with some worry that the whole thing was going to fall apart before I even finished stitching the first spiral! I put this down to my fear of the secret quilt police, who issued a whole host of dire warnings when I first began quilting. As you can see, I had no need of worry, the thread worked wonderfully, no problems with breakage or thread fatigue in the quilting.

Papillion Baby

This was also my first time using Mettler threads. I have a whole case of different ranges that I got as a free gift when I bought a new sewing machine at The Festival of Quilts.  The case includes cotton quilting and embroidery threads in a variety of thread weights, all of which I am looking forward to trying out.

Mettler Thread selection

Definitely worth waiting for a show if you are in the market for a new machine, there are some really great deals to be had.

Papillion Baby QuiltFor the back of the quilt I decided to use a single piece of fabric that was included in the quilt top. I thought about doing a pieced back with some of the left over nine patch blocks, however with the spiral quilting design I thought that a ‘clean’ back would really help the spiral stand out. I think I made the right decision, the spiral adds enough interest to the back of the quilt.

Papillion BabyFor the filling I have used Hobbs Heirloom wool batting. The finished quilt measures 42 inches x 48 inches (107 cm x 122 cm) All fabrics are quilting weight cotton. Fabric links can be found in this post Lilac Baby.

I love how pretty and feminine this quilt is, the colours are even better when seen by eye.

Lisa at The Quilting Bird

I will be linking up with Needle and Thread Thursday Crazy Mom Quilts Can I get a Whoop Whoop

 

Thank Friday It’s Finished! Animal Panel Baby Quilt

Ok, so I am posting this on Saturday, but technically I did finish it on Friday so it still counts!

Animal Panel Baby QuiltI had purchased a fabric panel without much thought as to what I would do with it. I didn’t just want a panel quilt with borders so added the red polka dot fabric which I think really enhances the original panel.

I used a block pattern called delectable mountains I found at Quilters Casche, to make the borders, I really didn’t want plain borders as I felt there wasn’t much going on in the panel.

I did a work in progress post for this quilt called redesigning a fabric panel, which details how I constructed this quilt. Here is the original panel that I sliced and diced:

Animal Panel Quilt

The quilting was originally stitch in the ditch, but I felt that was a little too plain and I wanted to connect the border to the central panel, so I added some straight line quilting.

Animal Panel Quilt Back

The patterning adds some more interest to the back, which was quite plain. I used a trilobal polyester thread in variegated green from Superior threads Rainbow range. If you read my post on the Animal Patches baby quilt, you will know that I had a lot of trouble with the bobbin thread breaking, caused by my machine not winding the bobbin tightly enough. Despite all the hassle I loved the look of the thread when the quilting was finished so decided to use it again here.

Animal Panel Quilt

It is a really lovely thread with a beautiful sheen that adds dimension to the quilting.

I have to admit that I have really struggled with this quilt creatively. I felt constrained by the panel and really had to fight to produce something that was a little bit different. I bought two panels, so I still have another one. I think I will cut it down and use them in different projects rather than in one quilt as I did here.

I am linking up with Show Off Saturday hosted by Sew Can She, Can I get a whoop whoop hosted by Confessions of a fabric addict, Fabric Frenzy Friday hosted by Fortworth Fabric Studio, The Handmade Hangout hosted by Too Much Time On My Hands, Finish It Friday hosted by Crazy Mom Quilts and Pretty Pintastic hosted by Coffee With Us 3.

Lisa at The Quilting Bird

You might also like to take a look at my Etsy shop TheQuiltingBird

 

 

 

 

 

Thank Friday Its Finished! Animal patches baby quilt

For those of you who read my work in progress post on the animal patches baby quilt (click here to read) and have been waiting patiently to see the finished quilt…ta da…

animal hearts baby quilt

I added a binding from a really cute floral fabric that picks up the colours used in the quilt top beautifully. Here is the back view…

animal patches baby quilt back

(Please ignore the coloured circles these are just my pin heads!) I had some real fun with the straight line quilting. You will remember from the work in progress post that I had a lot of bobbin thread breaks using a trilobal polyester thread because my very basic sewing machine is not capable of winding the bobbin tight enough. Despite the frustrations I am pleased I persevered because the thread looks beautiful on the quilt, unfortunately my camera skills are not good enough to really capture the beauty of the stitching. The thread is a variegated green from Superior’s rainbow collection and it really shines on the quilt adding more dimension to the simple quilting lines.

animal patches quilt fold

As usual I used a quilters dream wadding, all fabrics are 100% cotton and the quilt is finished with a double binding finished by hand. The finished size of the quilt is cot size.

To find out more about my inspiration for this quilt have a look at the work in progress post here.

I will be linking up with Thank Goodness It’s Finished Friday (TGIFF) this week hosted by Quilt Matters. Link A Finish Friday hosted by Richard and Tanya Quilts. Finish it up Friday hosted by Crazy Mom Quilts. Needle and Thread Thursday hosted by My Quilt Infatuation.

Lisa at The Quilting Bird

You might also like to take a look at my Etsy shop TheQuiltingBird

 

 

How to add a binding to your quilt.

Quilt Binding Tute

 

(The link to the binding tutorial is at the bottom of the post *Edited – The quilt in the photo is made by Marzi from Made by Marzipan, it is the quilt she uses to demonstrate how to attach a quilt binding)

Adding a binding to the quilt is generally the last step in making a quilt, although I will sometimes go back in and add more quilting after the binding has been added.

When I started quilting I really struggled to understand how to get those beautiful mitred corners. Even after I mastered that I still could not get to grips with the invisible join. The join isn’t actually ‘invisible’, it just looks the same as all the other joins so you can’t tell where the start and finish points are. I tried many different methods and gave up on achieving an invisible join for a long time.

I then came across a great tutorial on youtube, (gotta love youtube) and I am going to share it with you. It’s not too lengthy, under 8 minutes and has really simple, clear, step by step instructions. I love this video, I go back to it all the time to keep me in check. The video tutorial is by  Marzi (aka Maureen) at Made By Marzipan. If you love crafting click here to have a look at her cute blog packed full of lovely crafty ideas.

Heres what Marzi says about her quilt binding video:

“This tutorial includes everything you need to know to add a beautiful binding to your quilt! Learn how to sew a binding strip, how to create crisp mitered corners, and how to attach the binding together with a professional “invisible join.” See three different techniques for stitching the binding to the back side of your quilt. These instructions make it easy to bind a blanket.”

And after that long intro here is the link to the video click here and you can see the easy method Marzi uses to attach a binding to that gorgeous quilt in the picture.

Lisa at The Quilting Bird

You might also like to take a look at my Etsy shop TheQuiltingBird

Thank Friday It’s Finished – Mini Jungle baby quilt

Mini Jungle Baby Quilt

Another finished baby quilt. I called this one mini jungle because the fabrics have cute little jungle animals (I am not original with my quilt names…it’s lucky it even has a name).

Here’s the back.

Mini Jungle Baby Quilt BackI put a strip of that cute jungle fabric across the back, actually the blue fabric also has a jungle animal outline print on it.

The back view shows the quilting lines, the straight lines are from quilting in the ditch and the yellow curvy lines are from free motion quilted…don’t know what to call them…sort of vines. I was thinking vines and leaves when I quilted them.

And now for the front. Continue reading

Thank Friday It’s Finished! Wonky Blocks

SAMSUNG CSC

My finished project this week is this cutesy wonky block coverlet/blanket. There is no wadding in this (no sandwich filling, just the bread), so I didn’t want to call it a quilt, although the construction of it in every other way is exactly the same as for a quilt.

To make the wonky blocks in the central panel I used this really clear tutorial from Sleepy Owl Studio. Wonky blocks are easy to make, great for a beginner who wants to move on from ordinary square blocks.

I added a cream border in the same background fabric as the wonky panel, then I added a green polka dot fabric that co-ordinates beautifully with the wonky squares. I finished it off with another cream border and a bright cheerful yellow double binding. I like hand sewing so the binding was hand finished. Continue reading